BHUTAN TRAVELLER REFERENCE

SENIOR TRAVELLERS

Due to economics of tourism in Bhutan many visitors in the country are seniors travelling in organized groups. Hotels, guides and tour operators are quite familiar with the needs of seniors and treat them with the traditional respect that the Bhutanese have for their elders. The primary precaution one should take is to have an ample supply of any special medicines, since these probably will not be available in Bhutan. There is no privilege or special consideration for senior citizens. Any sort or exception for bearing seniority identification may not provide advantage in Bhutan.


TRAVEL WITH CHILDREN

Unlike as in the case for senior travelers, there are discounts for children travelling in Bhutan so it would make a good sense to travel along with your kids. They might be better companions and entertaining during the long, monotonous drives while travelling from one destination to another. On the other hand, they will be immediately accepted by local kids and their families, and they could make many new friends.
Lonely Planet’s Travel with Children by Cathy Lanigan, Two and Two Halves in Bhutan by Peter Steel is the books with lots of useful advice, suggestions, also describing the joys of travelling with children in Bhutan.


DISABLED TRAVELLERS

A cultural tour in Bhutan is a challenge for a traveler with physical disabilities, but is possible with some planning. The Bhutanese are eager to help, and one could arrange a strong companion to assist with moving about and getting in and out of vehicles. The roads are rough and sidewalks, where they exist, often have holes and sometimes steps. Hotels and public buildings do not have wheelchairs access, and there are no toilets designed to accommodate wheelchairs.
We recommend those visitors with disabilities and or those who are travelling with the disabled conduct some prior research.
For some general information there is a Web site for and by disabled travelers at http://www.travelhealth.com.htm.


LGBT TRAVELLERS

Like most Asians, the Bhutanese too believe that what one does in private is a strictly personal matter, and they would prefer not to discuss and be exposed to such issues. Public displays of affection are rare and not very well received.
It would be much appreciated if everyone, regardless of their gender orientation, show concerned discretion.